Wed 14 – Sun 18 Sept | SWELL MASTERCLASSES | ACKNOWLEDGING PLACE WORKSHOP | FREE

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POP IN WORKSHOP - ACKNOWLEDGING PLACE

Artist Carol McGregor – Wadawurrung (Kulin Nation)  

Pop in to Acknowledging Place workshop by Carol McGregor, daily from Wednesday 14th September to Sunday 18th September from 2-4pm. Paint native hibiscus leaves and be part of creating a communal artwork that acknowledges place. In yarning circles, participants will be encouraged to reflect on First Nations relations to the coastal and marine environment and their own relationship to place.   

When | Wednesday 14th – Sunday 18th September 

Time | 2.00pm – 4.00pm

Where | Wallace Nicoll Park, Currumbin Beach

Cost | FREE *No booking required

This event is part of the Altered Tides series hosted by Climate Action Beacon, Griffith University.   

ARTIST STATEMENT   

The leaves are an iconic heart shape and for me as an artist this natural heart causes me to pause, contemplate and reflect on love and respect for Country and being a guest on Yugambeh Country. We will be painting the leaves in the colours of the Aboriginal Flag (red =earth, yellow = sun and black = people) and attaching them to a recycled fishing net creating an ongoing communal artwork that acknowledges place.  

Before colonisation cotton or cottonwood trees (or native hibiscus – Hibiscus tiliaceus) were prolific – fringing the beaches and waterways and would have been a prominent local feature. The cotton tree was an important resource for Traditional Custodians of the Greater South-East Queensland region. Specifically, the inner bark of the tree provided fibre for making nets and dilly bags, the leaves and flowers were used for medicinal purposes and the young shoots and roots were eaten. As an Aboriginal artist, acknowledging the Traditional Custodians and the Country I walk on is always present, and hope that this workshop stimulates conversations along the themes of acknowledging place, including recognising what was here and an alternate Indigenous knowledge system that kept Australia environmentally stable for thousands of years.  

Image credit: Carol McGregor